Incident 23: Las Vegas Self-Driving Bus Involved in Accident

Description: A self-driving public shuttle developed by Keolis North America was involved in a collision with a human-driven delivery truck in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Alleged: Keolis North America developed and deployed an AI system, which harmed Keolis North America , Passengers and Motorists.

Suggested citation format

Anonymous. (2016-03-13) Incident Number 23. in McGregor, S. (ed.) Artificial Intelligence Incident Database. Responsible AI Collaborative.

Incident Stats

Incident ID
23
Report Count
24
Incident Date
2016-03-13
Editors
Sean McGregor

Tools

New ReportNew ReportNew ResponseNew ResponseDiscoverDiscover

CSET Taxonomy Classifications

Taxonomy Details

Full Description

A self-driving shuttle in Las Vegas was involved in a collision, with passengers on board, a few hours after its initial release. The Navya Arma model shuttle, developed by company Keolis North America, was backed-into by a human-driven delivery truck. The self-driving shuttle accurately detected the backing up truck and stopped its forward motion, however it did not reverse to avoid collision. The driver of the delivery truck was ticketed.

Short Description

A self-driving public shuttle developed by Keolis North America was involved in a collision with a human-driven delivery truck in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Severity

Minor

Harm Type

Harm to physical health/safety, Harm to physical property

AI System Description

Self-driving public transportation shuttles

System Developer

Keolis North America

Sector of Deployment

Transportation and storage

Relevant AI functions

Perception, Cognition, Action

AI Techniques

environment sensors, self-driving automobile, autonomous vehicle, radar, sonar

AI Applications

Self-driving automobiles, Interpreting traffic patterns

Location

Las Vegas, NV

Named Entities

Keolis North America

Technology Purveyor

Keolis North America

Beginning Date

2017-11-08T08:00:00.000Z

Ending Date

2017-11-08T08:00:00.000Z

Near Miss

Harm caused

Intent

Accident

Lives Lost

No

Infrastructure Sectors

Transportation

Data Inputs

Traffic patterns, data from cameras used to perceive the surroundings

Incident Reports

Las Vegas police and fire workers investigate the scene of a crash on northbound I-15 near the Washington Avenue exit on Saturday, March 12, 2016. (Brett Le Blanc/Las Vegas Review-Journal)

Las Vegas police and fire workers investigate the scene of a crash on northbound I-15 near the Washington Avenue exit on Saturday, March 12, 2016. (Brett Le Blanc/Las Vegas Review-Journal)

Twelve people were injured, one critically, when a shuttle bus overturned on Interstate 15 after a car swerved into its lane, causing it to overturn Saturday night, according to the Nevada Highway Patrol.

The driver of the car, a 2000 Toyota Celica, was taken into custody on suspicion of driving under the influence, trooper Jason Buratczuk said.

The highway patrol got a call at 7:43 p.m. about an accident involving the shuttle bus and a 2000 Toyota Celica, Buratczuk said.

“The Toyota was in the left travel lane, and the bus was in the middle lane. The Toyota was unable to maintain its lane and hit the shuttle bus,” Buratczuk said. The impact caused the shuttle bus to rotate, and the Toyota struck the bus a second time, and the bus came to rest on its left side, he said.

Ten people, including the driver, were on the bus, while three people, two female passengers and the male driver, were in the Toyota, he said.

One woman, a passenger on the bus, was critically injured and transported to University Medical Center’s trauma unit. Seven other people were taken to UMC emergency, and four others were transported to Sunrise Hospital Medical Center. Other than the critically injured woman, none of the others who were transported had life-threatening injuries, the highway patrol said.

The Toyota Celica driver, whose name was not released, is being held at the Clark County Detention Center, Buratczuk said.

The highway patrol interviewed several people at the scene following the accident, he said.

“When we got on scene, there were several witnesses who stated the driver was driving recklessly and at a high rate of speed prior to the crash,” Buratczuk said.

A total of 16 emergency vehicles, including fire trucks and ambulances, responded to the scene, he said.

Because of the incident, the Nevada Highway Patrol closed several onramps and portions of I-15. Among them are the U.S. 95 northbound ramp onto I-15 northbound, and U.S. 95 southbound to I-15 north. In addition, northbound traffic on I-15 is being diverted to U.S. 95.

“It’s a mess. We’ll be out here for another two to three hours,” Buratczuk said at about 11 p.m.

The state Department of Transportation is assisting with the hard road closures.

Shuttle bus collision with car injures 12 near downtown Las Vegas

27 Maximum speed, in mph

12 Number of passengers it can hold

When is it on the road? The vehicle drives along east Fremont Street between Las Vegas Boulevard and Eighth Street with regular street traffic from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The Innovation District in Downtown Las Vegas is pushing the boundaries on smart city technology, and one of its more popular tests to date is the self-driving shuttle.

Transporting riders around a 0.6-mile fixed route, the shuttle, a partnership with Navya, Keolis and AAA, has transported more than 10,000 passengers since launching in November. Its goal is to transport 100,000 passengers before the yearlong project commences.

When people see the shuttle cruising about downtown, they may not be aware of all the technology taking place for the autonomous vehicle to operate properly and safely.

How does the shuttle know where to go and what’s in its way?

The shuttle utilizes multisensor technology that includes various sensors and cameras to help the vehicle understand and visualize its surroundings. The sensors share information with the computer, which makes decisions and acts upon them. Autonomous vehicle testing won’t stop with the shuttle in the Innovation District, as an autonomous taxi, Robotaxi, took a test run during CES. Joanna Wadsworth, a city of Las Vegas traffic engineer, said there are tentative plans for a long-term pilot program this year.

Is it safe?

After the deadly crash involving a self-driving Uber vehicle and a pedestrian in Arizona, the City of Las Vegas has no plans to take its driverless shuttle program off the road.

“Our focus is always on providing safe, reliable and efficient transportation services to the residents and visitors of our city,” city spokesman Jace Radke said. “We are aware of the tragic accident in Arizona and will review the findings from that investigation when complete.”

Uber had been testing the self-driving vehicles in Tempe and Phoenix for months. Those tests have been suspended after the crash.

The city noted that the environment and the technology applications for the vehicle in Arizona differ from those being utilized in the Innovation District downtown.

In November, during the first day of the driverless shuttle program downtown, the vehicle was involved in a minor crash, when a delivery truck reversed into it. The shuttle was not at fault in the incident, Metro police concluded at the time. There have been no other incidents since the pilot began.

Odometry

Located in the wheelbase of the driverless shuttle, the odometry sensor estimates and then confirms the vehicle’s location and speed while it’s traveling.

Inertial Measurement Unit

Located at the front of the autonomous shuttle, the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) sensors determine the shuttle’s movement, estimating its sense of direction, linear speed and position.

Lidar Sensors

The driverless shuttle features two types of Lidar sensors. The Lidar 1 sensors have 360-degree capabilities, while the Lidar 2 sensors have 18-degree capabilities. There are two Lidar 1 sensors on the front and back of the vehicle, and six Lidar 2 sensors on all sides of the shuttle. The sensors use laser technology to measure distances. They map out the area around the driverless vehicle, including obstacles, and pinpoint the vehicle’s location within the area.

GNSS Antenna

The GNSS antenna is a global positioning system that communicates between the GPS sensor and a base station. It calculates the shuttle’s location at any time.

Cameras

Cameras at the front and back of the shuttle are used to analyze the vehicle’s surroundings beyond what the sensors and antenna do. The camera specifically looks for road signs and traffic lights, and is vital for obstacle detection and identification. The cameras can also confirm any objects or issues the sensors picks up on.

Traffic light

Six traffic lights along the shuttle’s route are outfitted with dedicated short-range radios (DSRC) mounted to the traffic pole that is nearest to the light’s traffic signal cabinet. The cabinet is the brain for the traffic signal and relays the signal phasing and timing patterns via a Trafficware controller, which is hardwired to the traffic light. The DSRC wirelessly broadcasts the traffic signals’ info to the DSRC receiver on the shuttle and relays it to the shuttle’s on-board computer. The shuttle then accepts the messages and has algorithms that tell it what to do.

This story originally appeared in the Las Vegas Weekly.

How does downtown's autonomous bus work?

A truck driver is blamed for the accident, which passengers say could have been avoided if the autonomous vehicle had only reversed

It took less than two hours for Las Vegas’s brand new self-driving shuttle to end up in a crash on Wednesday – thanks to a human.

The autonomous bus made its debut on public roads around the so called Innovation District in downtown Las Vegas in front of cameras and celebrities, dubbed America’s first self-driving shuttle pilot project geared toward the public. But within two hours it had already been involved in a minor crash with a lorry. No injuries were reported.

Jenny Wong, a passenger on the shuttle at the time of the crash, told local news station KSNV: “The shuttle just stayed still. And we were like, it’s going to hit us, it’s going to hit us. And then it hit us.

“The shuttle didn’t have the ability to move back. The shuttle just stayed still.”

Las Vegas police officer Aden Ocampo-Gomez said the truck’s driver was at fault for the crash and was cited for illegal backing.

“The shuttle did what it was supposed to do, in that its sensors registered the truck and the shuttle stopped to avoid the accident,” the city said in a statement. “Unfortunately the delivery truck did not stop and grazed the front fender of the shuttle. Had the truck had the same sensing equipment that the shuttle has, the accident would have been avoided.”

The oval-shaped shuttle can seat up to eight people and has an attendant and computer monitor, but no steering wheel or brake pedals. Developed by French company Navya, it uses GPS, electronic kerb sensors and other technology to find its way at no more than 15mph.

Before it crashed, dozens of people had lined up to get a free trip on a 0.6-mile loop around Fremont East, Las Vegas, including Nascar driver Danica Patrick and magic duo Penn and Teller. City spokesman Jace Radke said the shuttle took two more loops after the crash.

The year-long pilot project, sponsored by AAA Northern California, Nevada and Utah, is expected to carry 250,000 people. The AAA said human error was responsible for more than 90% of the 30,000 deaths on US roads in 2016, and that robotic cars could help reduce the number of incidents.

Google sibling Waymo announced on Tuesday that it is launching a fully autonomous Uber-like ride-hailing service with no human driver behind the wheel in Phoenix, Arizona in the next few months, making it the first such service accessible to the public with no one to take control in an emergency.

Self-driving bus involved in crash less than two hours after Las Vegas launch

The downtown Las Vegas self-driving shuttle isn’t exactly new. They’ve had these buses plying the strip for a while this year, with no incidents. The new shuttle is set to run a 0.6-mile loop course north of the Strip in the old downtown area. It’s a joint project put together by the City of Las Vegas, AAA, the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada, and the Keolis North America company, which runs mass transit in Las Vegas.

Top: AAA, Bottom: Jeff Zurschmeide/Digital Trends

The shuttle bus itself is a Navya Arma, an autonomous and electric French vehicle that’s already in use in several European cities. Let’s face it, self-driving tech is here: We’ve seen self-driving forklifts, and fleets of trucks will drive themselves around the U.K. next year. Horseless carriages are now driverless in in Phoenix, thanks to Waymo. The Vegas self-driving shuttle will hold about 12 people, including an attendant from Keolis. The attendant is kind of like an elevator operator – they don’t really need to be there, but they will make people feel more comfortable about using the new tech.

The organizers of the new shuttle line held a press event to launch the new service. They got NASCAR driver Danica Patrick, magicians Penn & Teller, the Mayor of Las Vegas, and various other dignitaries to talk about the new service. Among the points made was that over 90 percent of traffic collisions are due to human error, and they hope the new shuttle bus will make Las Vegas streets a little safer.

So what really happened?

Once the speechifying was over, the press and the public in attendance were invited to take a loop ride on the bus. The little shuttle did about 10 laps carrying people around, and when the crowd thinned out I went to take a ride and get some photos.

The so-called “crash” happened in super slow motion, and merely dented the shuttle’s plastic panels.

The bus drives very conservatively. If it senses a person walking across the street ahead, it stops. If there’s traffic on the street when it’s at a stop, it waits for the road to clear. It goes along at about 20 mph, and it’s a really gentle ride. The self-driving shuttle does exactly what it’s supposed to do.

On our ride, we encountered a medium-large articulated delivery truck stopped in the street. The driver was trying to back his trailer into an alleyway on the left. The shuttle bus very obediently stopped a reasonable distance from the truck and waited for it to move. That’s where things went wrong.

What the autonomous shuttle bus didn’t expect was that the truck would back up towards it. As the driver was swinging the trailer into the alley, the tractor portion of the truck was coming right at us – very slowly. We had plenty of time to watch it happen. I was taking pictures.

Jeff Zurschmeide/Digital Trends

The driver of the truck was probably watching where his trailer was going, and didn’t notice where we were. The so-called “crash” happened in super slow motion, and merely dented the plastic panels on the front of the shuttle. It was no big deal, although the Keolis attendant was understandably upset.

Analyzing the situation

This collision, like 90 percent of traffic incidents on our roads, was the result of human error. The truck driver got a ticket from the Las Vegas police. We could see his mirrors the whole time and he should have seen us. But I don’t want to be too harsh on the guy – driving a big truck in Las Vegas is a tough job, and he’s only human. His error could have happened to anyone.

The more the story has gone viral, the less it resembles what actually happened.

On the other side, the shuttle did exactly what it was programmed to do, and that’s a critical point. The self-driving program didn’t account for the vehicle in front unexpectedly backing up. We had about 20 feet of empty street behind us (I looked) and most human drivers would have thrown the car into reverse and used some of that space to get away from the truck. Or at least leaned on the horn and made our presence harder to miss. The shuttle didn’t have those responses in its program.

My suggestion to Navya and Keolis is that if the shuttle doesn’t have cameras and LIDAR facing backwards, it would be good to enable the shuttle to reverse if something’s coming toward it. And a horn for the attendant would be a good feature, too. But here’s the key thing about autonomous cars: we humans will learn from this accident and we can add those features and make all future shuttle buses better. In a very short while, any self-driving shuttle will know what to do in this kind of situation. Cars like the 2018 Audi A8, which flawlessly steers itself through traffic jams.

So there you have it. As

Digital Trends was onboard the ill-fated Las Vegas self-driving shuttle

Save this picture! Image via screenshot from video © Keolis Commuter Services

The drive to introduce autonomous vehicles to the roads took a blow yesterday, when a self-driving shuttle bus in Las Vegas was involved in a minor collision with a truck—just 2 hours into the vehicle's first day of operations. The bus, a 12-seat Navya Arma, was on the first day a 12-month trial covering a 0.6-mile (1-kilometer) loop in Las Vegas' Fremont East “Innovation District” when it was grazed by a reversing truck.

In a blog post by the city of Las Vegas, the blame was placed on the driver of the truck, who was cited by city officials for illegal backing. However, according to The Guardian, passengers at the time said the crash could have been avoided if the shuttle had simply backed out of the truck's way.

"The shuttle did what it was supposed to do, in that its sensors registered the truck and the shuttle stopped to avoid the accident," wrote the City of Las Vegas in their blog post. "Unfortunately the delivery truck did not stop and grazed the front fender of the shuttle. Had the truck had the same sensing equipment that the shuttle has the accident would have been avoided."

But passenger Jenny Wong told local radio station KSNV "The shuttle just stayed still. And we were like, it’s going to hit us, it’s going to hit us. And then it hit us. The shuttle didn’t have the ability to move back. The shuttle just stayed still."

As the "first autonomous shuttle in the United States to operate in open traffic," a fact proudly proclaimed on the side of the bus itself, it is likely that the shuttle was simply prioritizing traffic rules (ie don't reverse down a street) over the need to avoid the accident. As such, the incident could raise questions about how autonomous vehicles make decisions when faced with two undesirable alternatives. Such questions are not trivial: earlier this year, MIT launched an entire website devoted to crowdsourcing opinions on who should live and who should die in the event of an unavoidable fatal accident involving driverless cars.

For now at least, the Las Vegas shuttle suffered only minor damage and is expected to complete its planned 12-month trial.

News via City of Las Vegas blog and The Guardian.

Self-Driving Bus in Las Vegas Crashes Just 2 Hours After Launch

The self-driving shuttle suffered an unfortunate accident chalked up to human error just two hours after launch, but went on to complete its route regardless…

AAA in partnership with Keolis, launched the largest self-driving shuttle pilot project in the United States to operate in live traffic on 8 November.

Over the course of a year, the self-driving shuttle aims to provide a quarter of a million residents and visitors of Las Vegas with first-hand experience using autonomous vehicle (AV) technology.

Building on Keolis’ limited shuttle launch in downtown Las Vegas in early 2017, the shuttle is the country’s first autonomous shuttle to be fully integrated with smart-city infrastructure, communicating with traffic signals to improve safety and traffic flow.

The NAVYA shuttle comes equipped with LiDAR technology, GPS, cameras, and will seat eight passengers with seatbelts. Safety features include the ability to automatically and immediately brake in the event of a pedestrian crossing in the path of the vehicle.

The AAA will study how the shuttle interacts in a live traffic environment in downtown Las Vegas’ busy Innovation District, and survey riders on their experience in order to understand why a large percentage of consumers remain wary of driverless technology, and whether a personal experience changes their perception.

In addition to this, they will examine how others sharing the streets react to it – including pedestrians and cyclists.

Las Vegas was chosen for the launch because of the state’s progressive regulations on autonomous vehicles, heavy investment in innovation, the high volume of visitors and its favourable climate for testing new driving technology.

“We believe autonomous technology has the potential to save lives and improve traffic safety,” commented Tim Condon, President & CEO of AAA Northern California, Nevada & Utah.

Covering a 0.6-mile loop in the Fremont East Innovation District of downtown Las Vegas, the shuttle can be boarded at any of the autonomous vehicle shuttle’s three stops located on Fremont Street and Carson Street between Las Vegas Boulevard and 8th Street.

Less than two hours after its official unveiling and launch, however, the self-driving shuttle was involved in a crash. The accident has been chalked up to human error, with a lorry having reversed into the shuttle, hitting its front bumper.

Sensing the lorry’s approach, the shuttle ceased operation, but unaware of the its presence, the lorry’s driver continued driving. It is understood, however, that there were no injuries and no visible damage caused to the shuttle. Following the collision, the shuttle went on to complete its route circuit a further two times.

Keolis' self-driving shuttle launches in Las Vegas, crashes after two hours

A self-driving bus transporting passengers around downtown Las Vegas was involved in a collision with a truck on its first day of duty.

Built by French company Navya, the bus was carrying eight passengers when it collided with a truck - but city authorities have said the human driver of the truck was at fault. The police issued him with a ticket for causing the crash.

No one was hurt onboard the autonomous bus, which is said to have suffered only minor damage and will be back on the road before the end of the week. The autonomous shuttle bus service is the first of its kind to operate in the US.

Navya says the bus, which carries a qualified safety driver who can take control in the event of an emergency, is designed to carry up to 15 people and travel at 45km/h (28mph). However, for use on the Las Vegas route, the bus usually drives itself at around 25km/h and carries no more than eight people at a time, all of whom must wear a seatbelt.

The electric bus operates on a 0.6 mile loop in downtown Las Vegas and is free for residents to use. Navya previously ran a two-week trial with the bus back in January, before starting a permanent service on November 8. The collision with the truck occurred just an hour after that service began.

The accident occurred when a semi truck backed into a side road ahead of the bus. Seeing the truck blocking its path ahead, the bus stopped just as it is programmed to do. But the truck continued to reverse, striking the front of the bus at low speed before finally coming to a halt. The bus is able to back up to avoid oncoming vehicles, but did not do so in this scenario, according to a spokesperson for the shuttle service, who spoke to local news station KSNV News 3 Las Vegas.

Earlier the same day, Google sibling Waymo announced it had begun operating its driverless cars on the streets of Phoenix, Arizona with no human behind the wheel. The company, owned by Alphabet, will soon be using the vehicles to offer an on-demand, ride-hailing service - think Uber but without the human driver.

Las Vegas self-driving bus crashed into on its first day

None of the eight passengers aboard the driverless vehicle suffered injuries and neither did the truck driver. Instead, the front bumper of the shuttle took the brunt of the damage. A spokesperson for AAA, which is sponsoring the latest pilot program, said on Twitter that the accident was due to "human error" on the part of the truck driver.

Truck making delivery backed into shuttle, which was stopped. Human error causes most traffic collisions and this was no different. Driver of truck was cited. No one hurt except a bruised bumper! — Mike Blasky (@blasky) November 8, 2017

A representative of the Las Vegas City government also posted a note on its official Tumblr page detailing the accident. "The autonomous shuttle was testing today when it was grazed by a delivery truck downtown," reads the post. It continued: "The shuttle did what it was supposed to do, in that its sensors registered the truck and the shuttle stopped to avoid the accident. Unfortunately the delivery truck did not stop and grazed the front fender of the shuttle."

Simply stopping obviously wasn't enough to evade a collision in this case, which begs the question: Can the shuttle not move (or reverse) to avoid an object, even when the object is crawling towards it? KSNV News 3's Kyndell Nunley posed that question to a representative of Keolis, the French private transportation company that owns Navya. He replied: "It's designed to stop.. and yield to the moving object... But, if the moving object keeps coming toward the shuttle it can back up, but apparently in this case the truck just kept on going, and went right in to the side of the shuttle."

The trial is set to continue, but the incident will do little to ease the concerns of those skeptical about self-driving cars. The free autonomous shuttle service was the first of its kind in the US. In addition, Navya's 15-passenger Arma vehicles are also the stars of a similar program at the University of Michigan, and its tech will soon start powering driverless taxis (that can reach a top speed of 55 MPH). Let's hope the company learns from this incident, and the remainder of the testing.

Las Vegas' self-driving bus crashes in first hour of service

A new self-driving shuttle bus got off to a bumpy start in Las Vegas.

When the service debuted in the city on Wednesday, one of the driverless vehicles was involved in a collision with a delivery truck, the Las Vegas government said in a statement.

During the incident in downtown Las Vegas, the bus automatically stopped to try avoid an accident after its sensors detected the truck, the city said.

"Unfortunately, the delivery truck did not stop and grazed the front fender of the shuttle," it said. "Had the truck had the same sensing equipment that the shuttle has, the accident would have been avoided."

Related: Navya unveils its self-driving taxi

Local media reported that nobody was hurt in the accident.

The Las Vegas self-driving shuttle is a 12-month pilot project by AAA and Keolis, a transportation management company. The buses offer free rides on a 0.6 mile route around a district the city is developing as a technology hub.

The electric vehicles, which have eight seats, are made by Navya, a French company.

The pilot project will test how the self-driving shuttle fares as part of the city's transportation network while exposing the public to driverless technology.

The eight passengers inside the shuttle involved in the crash were all reported to have been wearing seat belts. One of them, Jenny Wong, told local broadcaster KLAS that it appeared that the truck driver hadn't seen the shuttle and continued to back up.

"We were all like, 'Oh my gosh, he's going to hit us, he's going to hit us,' and then, BAM!" she said.

Related: Waymo rolls out self-driving cars without test drivers

The truck driver was cited by authorities over the accident, the city said.

The shuttle was pulled from service for the rest of the day, but the city plans to continue the pilot project.

Self-driving bus involved in accident on its first day

Driverless bus in crash after two hours on road in Las Vegas

Driverless bus in crash after two hours on road in Las Vegas

The driverless bus smoothly rolls into a parking space in Las Vegas

A driverless shuttle bus has been involved in a crash less than two hours after it was launched in Las Vegas.

Police said a lorry driver who reversed into the electric vehicle was responsible for the prang, which did not cause any injuries.

City spokesman Jace Radke said the shuttle stopped when it sensed the lorry was approaching, but the larger vehicle kept moving.

Image: Passengers on the driverless bus before the accident

The lorry hit the front bumper of the bus, but there was no visible damage and the shuttle did two more circuits of its route after the accident.

The collision happened soon after an unveiling ceremony to promote what officials described as the first self-driving shuttle pilot project aimed at the US public.

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Image: A sign in the back window reads: 'Look ma, no driver'

The bus, which can hold up to 12 passengers, has an attendant and computer monitor but no steering wheel or brake pedals.

It uses GPS and electronic kerb sensors to navigate the roads.

Before the crash near the Fremont Street entertainment district, dozens of people had queued up for a free journey in downtown Las Vegas.

Driverless bus in crash after two hours on road in Las Vegas

Sipa USA via AP

Within its first hours of operation Wednesday, an autonomous shuttle bus that is part of a ballyhooed study of driverless vehicles on public roads in Las Vegas was involved in a collision with a truck. No injuries were reported in the midafternoon crash, described by one organizer of the project as a “fender bender.”

Details are still emerging. The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department did not return requests for comment Wednesday and has not yet issued a crash report.

A spokesperson for AAA, which is a sponsor of the planned yearlong study, said the shuttle stopped as it sensed the truck ahead and remained stationary when the truck backed into the left-front side of the shuttle, which carried multiple passengers.

“The shuttle came to a complete stop,” John Moreno, manager of AAA’s Northern California, Nevada, and Utah office, told Car and Driver. “Unfortunately, the truck did not, and it hit the shuttle. If only the truck had the autonomous technology, this would likely not have occurred.” Moreno said responding officers issued a citation to the driver of the truck.

Built by French manufacturer Navya, the shuttle has already been utilized in pilot projects in Europe and carried members of the public there. It has no traditional vehicle controls such as a steering wheel or brake pedal. In Las Vegas, a human safety steward was aboard the shuttle and can stop operations with the push of an emergency button.

Sipa USA via AP

Passengers step onto a Navya Arma autonomous electric shuttle during a demonstration on Fremont Street in downtown Las Vegas on November 8, 2017.

Shuttle operations were on hold as of Wednesday night. Moreno said the companies involved, which include the vehicle’s owner, Keolis, a French provider of mass-transit networks and projects, expect to resume operations in a matter of days. First, they want to ensure none of the sensors, including radar, lidar, and cameras, were damaged in the incident. Further, they want to review data from the sensors to better understand what happened.

“That’s the good thing about this technology,” Moreno said. “There’s nothing left to theory. We’re downloading all the data and doing a review on that, trying to figure out exactly what happened. We’re going through the data and the camera images and really trying to gain a holistic view of the incident.”

Aside from wrecking the much anticipated shuttle debut in a city eager to promote autonomous testing, the incident raised questions about how well human and machine can get along on shared roads. Human drivers take for granted some of the everyday interactions that occur between themselves and fellow motorists, but those may grow more complicated in a traffic environment that contains both human-driven and automated vehicles.

“ “The shuttle came to a complete stop. Unfortunately,

the truck did not, and it hit the shuttle.” – John Moreno, AAA ”

For instance, a human driver likely would have honked the horn at the truck as it backed up and attempted to maneuver out of the way to avoid the crash. Moreno said that the Navya shuttles emit similar audible warnings and that it can shift into reverse. But he couldn’t yet say how the audible warning functioned Wednesday, and he noted that the incident unfolded so quickly, the shuttle didn’t have time to respond beyond stopping.

During regular operations, the eight-passenger electric shuttle is expected to run on a fixed 0.6-mile loop in the Fremont section of the city, making three stops along its route. Beyond its autonomous capabilities, Keolis said the shuttle is the first autonomous vehicle to integrate with traffic lights, which could lead to improved traffic flow and reduced congestion.

Before the crash, the shuttle’s launch had been feted by local dignitaries. Only hours before the crash, Las Vegas had hosted a welcome party of sorts (shown above), with appearances from Las Vegas mayor Carolyn Goodman, comedians/magicians Penn & Teller, and race-car driver Danica Patrick. AAA says it hopes to get as many as 250,000 riders aboard the automated vehicle during its yearlong study in the city.

Self-Driving-Shuttle Era Begins with a First-Day Crash in Vegas

A driverless shuttle bus being tested in Las Vegas was involved in a crash an hour into its first day on the job - although it wasn't the vehicle's fault.

The eight-seater vehicle, started as a pilot of Las Vegas' smart city infrastructure, experienced a minor collision after a delivery lorry reversed into it. While the vehicle stopped when it noticed the lorry reversing, it also failed to avoid it.

Several people were inside the vehicle when it was hit.

The incident is the latest in a series of crashes involving driverless vehicles, the vast majority of which have been caused by the other vehicle's driver.

Almost all the incidents recorded by Waymo, Google's autonomous vehicle arm, have been down to human drivers hitting the vehicles, and a major crash involving Uber's driverless cars in March was down to the driver of the other car.

Driverless car involved in crash in first hour of first day

"The shuttle did what it was supposed to do, in that its sensors registered the truck and the shuttle stopped to avoid the accident," the City of Las Vegas said in a statement to KSNY. "Had the truck had the same sensing equipment that the shuttle has the accident would have been avoided."

Self-driving bus gets into accident on its first day in Las Vegas, human driver blamed for collision

A self-driving shuttle bus in Las Vegas has crashed into a lorry on its first day of testing, but police have said that the human driver of the lorry was to blame and have given him a ticket.

The shuttle is the first of its kind in the US, and Navya, the French tech firm behind the bus, is also performing test programmes in London and Paris.

Passengers told local news outlet KSNV that the shuttle bus simply stopped as the truck continued to reverse, and didn't move out of the way. Nevertheless, Las Vegas city representatives seem happy at the result – none of the passengers was injured and the shuttle apparently performed as it was designed to.

A statement issued by the city of Las Vegas said that the crash was a minor collision and that the bus should be back on the road on Thursday after a few routine tests: 'The autonomous shuttle was testing today when it was grazed by a delivery truck downtown. The shuttle did what it was supposed to do, in that its sensors registered the truck and the shuttle stopped to avoid the accident. Unfortunately, the delivery truck did not stop and grazed the front fender of the shuttle.'

The Navya bus runs on electric motors and can carry up to 15 passengers, but the smaller Las Vegas model has eight seats fitted with seatbelts and follows a route downtown, away from the strip. The bus is designed to run at speeds of up to 28mph, but its French manufacturers say that depending on the application it is usually limited to a more sedate 15mph. Navya also says that its buses are equipped with the latest Lidar, stereo camera and GPS technology to ensure that they are safe on the road.

Navya has a fleet of 50 autonomous shuttle buses deployed worldwide, and says that it has carried over 200,000 passengers so far. In July 2017 it announced that it would be building a factory in Michigan for the construction of its buses.

Self-driving shuttle bus crashes on first day of testing

A Las Vegas-based self-driving shuttle service celebrated its launch day by getting into an accident with a human driver, according to a news report from local Nevada broadcast station KSNV News 3. The shuttle, made by French startup Navya and owned and operated by French private transportation company Keolis, operates on a 0.6-mile loop around downtown Las Vegas offering free rides to residents. Within an hour of starting its new expanded operation today, following a two-week pilot test back in January, the shuttle hit the front end of a large delivery truck as the human driver pulled out into the street from a loading bay.

A spokesperson for AAA, which is working with Las Vegas and Keolis to sponsor the program and survey driver attitudes toward autonomous vehicles, confirmed on Twitter that the accident was actually the truck driver’s fault. As is the case with a vast majority of accidents involving driverless cars, you can chalk this one up to human error. Luckily, only the front bumper of the shuttle was damaged, and none of the eight passengers or the truck driver were injured.

A representative of the Las Vegas city government posted a note on its official Tumblr page further describing the incident:

The autonomous shuttle was testing today when it was grazed by a delivery truck downtown. The shuttle did what it was supposed to do, in that it’s sensors registered the truck and the shuttle stopped to avoid the accident. Unfortunately the delivery truck did not stop and grazed the front fender of the shuttle. Had the truck had the same sensing equipment that the shuttle has the accident would have been avoided. Testing of the shuttle will continue during the 12-month pilot in the downtown Innovation District. The shuttle will remain out of service for the rest of the day. The driver of the truck was cited by Metro.

It’s good to know that testing is confirmed to continue. Keolis’ service marks the country’s first ever driverless public transportation option, and it feels largely indicative of how a majority of Americans will first interact with autonomous cars. While the crash will undoubtedly stoke fear among the more paranoid, artificial intelligence-fearing crowd, the best way to prove the viability of self-driving vehicles is to get more of them on public roads where passengers and drivers alike can experience the technology.

A self-driving shuttle in Las Vegas got into an accident on its first day of service

It's hard not to chuckle at this one, partly for the silly situation, but also for how the blame has been shifted to the truck driver. Various media outlets are reporting a fender bender collision (literally) between a driverless shuttle bus and a tractor-trailer in Las Vegas on Nov. 8. The shuttle bus had been unveiled just two hours earlier, billed as the nation's first self-driving shuttle pilot-project geared toward the public.

The egg-shaped people mover has no driver controls but did have a human monitor onboard. According to reports, the bus was gently struck by a tractor-trailer in the midst of a backing maneuver. Images show the truck partially backed into an alley, with the shuttle bus up against the right fender of the truck. The truck driver was cited for "illegal backing," the mainstream media reports.

Some press reports are quoting a statement released by the City of Las Vegas, suggesting the collision could have been prevented if the truck had been equipped with the same collision avoidance technology the bus was using.

"The shuttle did what it was supposed to do, in that it's [sic] sensors registered the truck and the shuttle stopped to avoid the accident," the city said in a statement. "Unfortunately the delivery truck did not stop and grazed the front fender of the shuttle. Had the truck had the same sensing equipment that the shuttle has, the accident would have been avoided."

I wasn't there to witness the incident, but having backed trucks into alleyways thousands of times, here's how I see the event unfolding: The truck driver sets up for the backing maneuver, positioning the tractor and trailer at some angle aiming the rear of the trailer toward the alley. The tractor would likely have been facing away from the oncoming shuttle bus, and thus probably the shuttle would not have been visible to the truck driver. As the tractor swung around, the driver probably saw the shuttle approaching, but made the mistake of assuming it would stop, as most human-controlled vehicles would do when confronted by a reversing tractor-trailer.

The truck driver should have exited the truck and surveyed the area for obstructions and oncoming traffic, and probably should have had a spotter in place before starting to back into the alley (hence the illegal backing ticket?).

Even if the driver was in the wrong at this point, had a human been at the wheel of the shuttle bus, he or she would surely have noticed the truck and taken steps to either steer around it or stop before it got too close to the truck. A human driver might have sounded the horn and probably flipped the truck driver the bird on the way by. There's no mention in the press reports of whether or not the bus even has a horn.

At any rate, the shuttle bus is being credited with stopping before a more serious collision occurred. It did stop, after all, but right in the path of the truck and right in the driver's blind spot. My question is, why did it not stop further back from the truck, or even back up to avoid the collision -- like a human driver would have done?

Most of the press reports give the shuttle bus the benefit of the doubt here, but I maintain that the bus did not take appropriate action to avoid the collision. Chris Barker, spokesman for the shuttle operator, Keolis North America, says the bus performed the way it was designed.

"Unfortunately, the truck driver didn't yield," he says in a YouTube clip.

True enough, the truck driver didn't yield, but you'd think a vehicle designed to carry people would have been given a little more operational latitude than to simply stop and wait to see what happens next.

As they say, it's not smart enough to come in out of the rain.

The shuttle is part of a one-year pilot project, sponsored by the American Automobile Association of Northern California, Nevada and Utah. Such buses will be motoring around the Las Vegas at no more than 15 mph, which is still plenty fast when it runs into something.

Truck Driver Gets the Blame in Driverless Shuttle Bus Crash

If you’re having a bad day, spare a thought for the autonomous bus that crashed in the first hour of its first day of operation. A self-driving eight-seater electric shuttle, designed to run in a continuous loop in downtown Las Vegas, became the first autonomous service operating in real-time traffic when it hit the road Wednesday. Unfortunately, a collision with a delivery truck brought the momentous occasion to a sudden halt.

“The shuttle just stayed still and we were like ‘oh my gosh, it’s gonna hit us, it’s gonna hit us!’ and then, it hit us!” Jenny Wong, one of the eight people on board, told KSNV.

In the incident, the city claims that the autonomous shuttle “did what it was supposed to do,” and stopped to avoid a collision:

The autonomous shuttle was testing today when it was grazed by a delivery truck downtown. The shuttle did what it was supposed to do, in that it’s sensors registered the truck and the shuttle stopped to avoid the accident. Unfortunately the delivery truck did not stop and grazed the front fender of the shuttle. Had the truck had the same sensing equipment that the shuttle has the accident would have been avoided.

The project is a collaboration between the American Automobile Association, transportation firm Kelois and tech firm Navya. The team aims to get a quarter of a million people to try out the technology for themselves, offering rides for free. The program builds on a previous test launched earlier this year, which saw a 12-passenger shuttle ride along Vegas’ Fremont Street.

The shuttle, which lacks a steering wheel and pedals, made its American debut at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show. Watch the vehicle in action here:

Fortunately, no passengers were hurt in Wednesday’s incident. The truck driver was cited by local police. The city plans to continue the pilot program for the rest of its 12-month duration, but the shuttle was out of service for the rest of the day.

Self-Driving Bus Crashed in Vegas in Its First Hour: Who Was At Fault?

Wednesday was supposed to be the triumphant launch of a free, driverless shuttle in downtown Las Vegas. Designed by French company Navya, operated by another French company called Keolis, and sponsored by the city and American Automobile Association, the year-long pilot project was supposed to demonstrate the potential of slow-moving autonomous vehicles to change the transit industry.

Instead, within hours, the project was greeted with the worst possible headline: "Self-driving shuttle bus in crash on first day."

The headline, and lots of others like it, were technically accurate but a little misleading. Officials say the other vehicle—a semi truck that bumped into the shuttle while backing up—was at fault. And it was such a low-speed collision that no one was injured. The accident "merely dented the plastic panels on the front of the shuttle," according to Jeff Zurschmeide of Digital Trends.

So the implication of a lot of headlines—that the shuttle malfunctioned and caused a serious crash—is totally wrong.

What's not clear is whether the shuttle could have done more to prevent the collision.

Drive thyself

Zurschmeide happened to be on the bus at the time the crash occurred and explains just what happened:

On the other side, the shuttle did exactly what it was programmed to do, and that’s a critical point. The self-driving program didn’t account for the vehicle in front unexpectedly backing up. We had about 20 feet of empty street behind us (I looked) and most human drivers would have thrown the car into reverse and used some of that space to get away from the truck. Or at least leaned on the horn and made our presence harder to miss. The shuttle didn’t have those responses in its program.

But Keolis, the company operating the self-driving shuttle, told reporter Pete Bigelow the opposite:

  1. Shuttle is capable of reversing directions. It didn't in this case, because cars were stopped behind it. It was essentially boxed in, says Chris Barker, VP of new mobility at Keolis. — Pete Bigelow (@PeterCBigelow) November 9, 2017

The police report, due out next week, might help to clear things up.

Either way, a clear lesson here is that self-driving vehicles need to be able to do more than just avoid causing accidents. They also need to be programmed to take the kind of common-sense steps human drivers would take to prevent accidents even when they're technically the fault of another driver.

A 2015 study looking at the first 1.2 million miles of self-driving car data found the vehicles (which at the time mostly meant Google cars, though Audi and Delphi also had some cars on the road) seemed to actually get in accidents more often than human-driven cars. The accidents were mostly minor fender-benders, and all of them were the fault of the other vehicle. Even a rather dramatic accident that caused one of Uber's self-driving research vehicles to roll over earlier this year was caused by driver error in the other car.

One possible explanation for those 2015 findings is that human drivers routinely fail to report minor accidents of this type. But another possibility is that these early self-driving cars drive in ways that human drivers can find confusing or unexpected—like slowing down at a stop light earlier than a human driver would. If self-driving cars are legally at fault in no accidents but still drive in a way that leads to other drivers hitting them at an elevated rate, that becomes a problem in its own right.

The good news is that these kinds of accidents rarely if ever lead to human injuries. So while this is certainly something that Navya and other driverless vehicle companies should work on, it's not something to freak out about. It shouldn't be difficult to train a driverless car to notice an impending accident and take action—like backing up or moving forward—to prevent it. Someone at each driverless car company just needs to do the work.

The real lesson of that self-driving shuttle’s first-day accident

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Federal transportation safety officials headed to Las Vegas on Friday to investigate a collision this week between a self-driving shuttle bus on its first day of service and a truck, which was blamed on human error.

The first public self-driving shuttle, launched as a pilot project sponsored by AAA and Keolis is shown in downtown Las Vegas, Nevada, November 10, 2017. Courtesy of AAA/Keolis/Handout via REUTERS

The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, which has the power to issue safety recommendations and determines probable causes of crashes, wants to learn more about “how self-driving vehicles interact with their environment and the other human-driven vehicles around them,” said NTSB spokesman Christopher O’Neil.

There have been other crashes involving self-driving vehicles but this was the first involving a self-driving vehicle operating in public service, O’Neil said. Four NTSB investigators were expected to arrive in Las Vegas on Friday.

The Navya Arma, an autonomous and electric vehicle operated by Keolis North America, went into service on Wednesday. A few hours later, a delivery truck backed into the stopped shuttle, according to a reporter on the shuttle and one of its sponsor companies.

Las Vegas police issued the truck driver a ticket, the city government said in a blog post. The shuttle’s front end sustained minor damage, including a crumpled front fender, and resumed service on Thursday.

“The shuttle did what it was supposed to do, in that its sensors registered the truck and the shuttle stopped,” the city said.

The Automobile Association of America (AAA) of Southern Nevada, one of the shuttle’s sponsors, said it would assist the safety board’s investigation.

“Working together and sharing information will ensure this new technology is safely implemented for the public, and that’s AAA’s top priority,” the organization said in a statement.

The shuttle is also sponsored by the city of Las Vegas, Keolis North America and the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada.

Reporter Jeff Zurschmeide, who was on the shuttle at the time of the crash, said the self-driving vehicle did what it was programmed to do but not everything a human driver might do.

“That’s a critical point,” Zurschmeide wrote on digitaltrends.com. “We had about 20 feet of empty street behind us (I looked), and most human drivers would have thrown the car into reverse and used some of that space to get away from the truck. Or at least leaned on the horn and made our presence harder to miss.”

The crash follows a rising number of incidents involving human drivers behaving improperly or recklessly around self-driving cars. There have been 12 crashes in California alone since Sept. 8 involving General Motors Co’s self-driving unit, Cruise Automation. All were the fault of human drivers in other vehicles, GM told regulators.

The NTSB investigated a May 2016 crash of a Tesla Inc Model S that killed a driver using the vehicle’s semi-autonomous “Autopilot” system. In September, the board recommended that auto safety regulators and automakers take steps to ensure that semi-autonomous systems were not misused.

U.S. safety board to probe self-driving shuttle crash in Las Vegas

This was the first crash to have happen­ed involv­ing a self-drivin­g vehicl­e operat­ing in public servic­e

Federal transportation safety officials headed to Las Vegas on Friday to investigate a collision this week between a self-driving shuttle bus on its first day of service and a truck, which was blamed on human error.

The US National Transportation Safety Board, which has the power to issue safety recommendations and determines probable causes of crashes, wants to learn more about “how self-driving vehicles interact with their environment and the other human-driven vehicles around them,” said NTSB spokesman Christopher O‘Neil.

Self-driving startups race down a narrowing road

There have been other crashes involving self-driving vehicles but this was the first involving a self-driving vehicle operating in public service, O‘Neil said. Four NTSB investigators were expected to arrive in Las Vegas on Friday.

The Navya Arma, an autonomous and electric vehicle operated by Keolis North America, went into service on Wednesday. A few hours later, a delivery truck backed into the stopped shuttle, according to a reporter on the shuttle and one of its sponsor companies.

Las Vegas police issued the truck driver a ticket, the city government said in a blog post. The shuttle’s front end sustained minor damage, including a crumpled front fender, and resumed service on Thursday.

“The shuttle did what it was supposed to do, in that its sensors registered the truck and the shuttle stopped,” the city said.

The Automobile Association of America (AAA) of Southern Nevada, one of the shuttle’s sponsors, said it would assist the safety board’s investigation.

“Working together and sharing information will ensure this new technology is safely implemented for the public, and that’s AAA’s top priority,” the organization said in a statement.

The shuttle is also sponsored by the city of Las Vegas, Keolis North America and the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada.

Reporter Jeff Zurschmeide, who was on the shuttle at the time of the crash, said the self-driving vehicle did what it was programmed to do but not everything a human driver might do.

This is what Apple’s ‘self-driving car’ looks like

“That’s a critical point,” Zurschmeide wrote on digitaltrends. “We had about 20 feet of empty street behind us (I looked), and most human drivers would have thrown the car into reverse and used some of that space to get away from the truck. Or at least leaned on the horn and made our presence harder to miss.”

The crash follows a rising number of incidents involving human drivers behaving improperly or recklessly around self-driving cars. There have been 12 crashes in California alone since September 8 involving General Motors self-driving unit, Cruise Automation. All were the fault of human drivers in other vehicles, GM told regulators.

The NTSB investigated a May 2016 crash of a Tesla Model S that killed a driver using the vehicle’s semi-autonomous “Autopilot” system. In September, the board recommended that auto safety regulators and automakers take steps to ensure that semi-autonomous systems were not misused.

Read full story

US safety board to probe self-driving shuttle crash in Las Vegas

Last week, a driverless shuttle in Las Vegas had its inaugural day of operation derailed, when a truck backed into it at a super-slow speed. The minor bump may seem inconsequential, but since it involved an autonomous vehicle and a human motorist—a notable concern as more automated cars hit the road—regulators are interested in understanding what transpired.

No injuries were reported and, within a day, the shuttle—operated by transit company Keolis and built by French-based Navya ARMA—was back on the road. Even so, the National Transportation Safety Board, the federal agency that investigates major crashes and issues safety recommendations, dispatched investigators to review what happened in Las Vegas.

“The NTSB is investigating this crash to better understand how self-driving vehicles interact with their environment and the other human-driven vehicles around them,” the agency said in a statement.

“While there have been other crashes of self-driving vehicles, this crash is the first of a self-driving vehicle operating in public service. Our decision to investigate this crash aligns with our process of deciding to investigate those highway crashes that can advance our knowledge of safety issues.”

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In September, the board produced an extensive review of a fatal 2016 crash involving a Tesla owner whose car was operating in its semi-autonomous Autopilot mode—so it’s not surprising to see it taking interest in the minor bump involving a driverless shuttle, even if the shuttle wasn’t at fault.

Car & Driver, which put together a super-detailed report on the accident, spoke to a Keolis rep said the shuttle worked as intended. Some accounts vary on the final moments before impact, which makes the NTSB probe all the more interesting to follow.

Here’s more from Car & Driver:

The shuttle bus does not have traditional controls such as a steering wheel, brake pedal, or accelerator. But it can be manually operated with a small device that looks akin to a video-game controller, and for the purposes of the yearlong demonstration there is an attendant, a Keolis employee, aboard for all rides along the vehicle’s 0.6-mile fixed route. [Keolis rep Chris] Barker said the attendant can use the controller to guide the shuttle through thorny situations, such as if a traffic light is out and a police officer is guiding traffic through an intersection. It is unclear in this case whether the attendant may have had an opportunity to guide the shuttle out of the truck’s path Wednesday. Accounts vary as to what happened in the final seconds before the collision. Barker said the shuttle is equipped with a horn that activates when the shuttle’s lidar sensors detect that an object, be it another vehicle or a pedestrian, is getting too close to the vehicle. He said it sounded prior to Wednesday’s crash; [Jeff Zurschmeide, a writer for Digital Trends who was on board at the time], said he did not hear the horn.

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The U.S. transportation department and lawmakers have so far taken a relatively hands-off approach to testing of autonomous vehicles. It may seem silly to deploy resources for this sort of thing, but having the independent NTSB produce a record of how this technology functions in the real world will provide much-needed context on how AVs can safely be deployed.

The free driverless shuttle covers a 0.6-mile loop through downtown Las Vegas and makes three stops along the route.

Las Vegas' Driverless Shuttle Is Back In Service But The Feds Want To Examine What Happened

MINNEAPOLIS, Minnesota. The bus had only been on the road for two hours when it crashed. A self-driving shuttle was launched in Las Vegas to great celebration and acclaim. It is designed to move passengers through the city on a 0.6-mile-long route. The rides are free and are designed to raise awareness about technology in the city. The project designers hoped that it would increase the public’s general comfort with autonomous technology while allowing researchers the chance to study the technology in action within a city. Yet, the project got off to a bumpy (or, shall we say, fender bending?) start. According to the Guardian, project managers boasted that the bus was the first self-driving vehicle to be used with the general public. Two hours later, it had its first accident. While the accident was minor (just a fender bender in which no one was reported hurt) the accident raises questions about autonomous vehicle safety in cities.

Americans are already highly skeptical about whether self-driving cars, vehicles, or buses will be safe. This crash only raises more questions about whether autonomous vehicles should be permitted on the road. While there were no injuries noted in the crash, the accident has garnered national attention.

Yet, according to reports, human error was actually to blame for the crash. A truck driver was backing up illegally and the self-driving bus didn’t reverse to avoid the crash. The shuttle’s sensors apparently noted the truck and the shuttle stopped as it had been designed to do. The truck, however, kept backing up. CNN reports that had the delivery truck been equipped with autonomous sensing gear, the accident could have been avoided entirely.

According to AAA, human error leads to the vast majority of accidents on the road. As many as 90% of accidents may be the result of human error. Cell phone use, distracted driving, speeding, and fatigue all contribute to accidents on the road.

Yet, will this crash slow down the push for fully autonomous vehicles? Not likely. Waymo still plans to move forward with launching a ride-hailing service featuring autonomous vehicles in Phoenix, Arizona.

The Law Office of Martin T. Montilino are car accident lawyers in Minneapolis, Minnesota who are aware that the vast majority of accidents result from driver error. Yet, any new technology needs to be proven safe before it should be used with the general public. Our firm is closely watching the development of the technology and we are ready to help individuals fight back should they be injured by a vehicle where no driver is behind the wheel. As it stands, in Minnesota, even cars with autonomous functions require a back-up driver. If you’ve been in a crash and have been hurt, visit the personal injury lawyers at the Law Office of Martin T. Montilino today in Minneapolis, Minnesota to learn more about how we may be able to help you seek the recovery you may deserve under the law.

Self-Driving Bus Crashes Two Hours After Being Put on the Road

(TNS) — After a pedestrian was hit and killed Sunday by an Uber self-driving car in Arizona, the city of Las Vegas said it has no plans to take its driverless shuttle off the road.

The Uber vehicle was in autonomous mode with an operator behind the wheel when it hit the woman, who was walking outside of a crosswalk, Tempe, Ariz., police said today. The woman died of her injuries at a hospital.

Uber has been testing the self-driving vehicles in Tempe and Phoenix for months. The tests were suspended after the crash.

The self-driving shuttle pilot project in downtown Las Vegas, which began in November, is a joint venture by AAA, the transportation company Keolis and the city.

“Our focus is always on providing safe, reliable and efficient transportation services to the residents and visitors of our city,” said Jace Radke, a spokesman for Las Vegas. “We are aware of the tragic accident in Arizona and will review the findings from that investigation when complete.”

The day the Las Vegas shuttle launched, it was involved in a minor crash when a delivery truck reversed into it, official said. The shuttle was not at fault, Metro Police said.

There have been no other accidents with the shuttle, officials said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

©2018 the Las Vegas Sun (Las Vegas, Nev.) Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Las Vegas Won't Stop Driverless Shuttle Program after Fatal Accident in Arizona

Before it crashed, dozens of people had lined up to get a free trip on a 0.6-mile loop around Fremont East, Las Vegas, including Nascar driver Danica Patrick and magic duo Penn and Teller

Nov 11, 2017-It took less than two hours for Las Vegas’s brand new self-driving shuttle to end up in a crash on Wednesday—thanks to a human.

The autonomous bus made its debut on public roads around the so called Innovation District in downtown Las Vegas in front of cameras and celebrities, dubbed America’s first self-driving shuttle pilot project geared toward the public. But within two hours it had already been involved in a minor crash with a lorry. No injuries were reported.

Jenny Wong, a passenger on the shuttle at the time of the crash, told local news station KSNV: “The shuttle just stayed still. And we were like, it’s going to hit us, it’s going to hit us. And then it hit us.

“The shuttle didn’t have the ability to move back. The shuttle just stayed still.”

Las Vegas police officer Aden Ocampo-Gomez said the truck’s driver was at fault for the crash and was cited for illegal backing.

“The shuttle did what it was supposed to do, in that its sensors registered the truck and the shuttle stopped to avoid the accident,” the city said in a statement. “Unfortunately the delivery truck did not stop and grazed the front fender of the shuttle. Had the truck had the same sensing equipment that the shuttle has, the accident would have been avoided.”

The oval-shaped shuttle can seat up to eight people and has an attendant and computer monitor, but no steering wheel or brake pedals. Developed by French company Navya, it uses GPS, electronic kerb sensors and other technology to find its way at no more than 15mph.

Before it crashed, dozens of people had lined up to get a free trip on a 0.6-mile loop around Fremont East, Las Vegas, including Nascar driver Danica Patrick and magic duo Penn and Teller. City spokesman Jace Radke said the shuttle took two more loops after the crash.

The year-long pilot project, sponsored by AAA Northern California, Nevada and Utah, is expected to carry 250,000 people. The AAA said human error was responsible for more than 90 percent of the 30,000 deaths on US roads in 2016, and that robotic cars could help reduce the number of incidents.

Google sibling Waymo announced on Tuesday that it is launching a fully autonomous Uber-like ride-hailing service with no human driver behind the wheel in Phoenix, Arizona in the next few months, making it the first such service accessible to the public without no one to take control in an emergency.

—©2017 The Guardian

Published: 11-11-2017 07:51

Self-driving bus involved in crash less than two hours after Las Vegas launch

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